Pioneer history, lifestyle key strengths at Holowiliena

Pioneer history, lifestyle key strengths at Holowiliena

News
Aa

Frances and Luke Frahn, Holowiliena Station, Cradock, have a long history in the Flinders Ranges, but they are "quite new to tourism".

Aa
STATION INSIGHT: Luke and Frances Frahn, Cradock, were in Port Augusta to share their story of building tourism at the Diversification from the Dust forum.

STATION INSIGHT: Luke and Frances Frahn, Cradock, were in Port Augusta to share their story of building tourism at the Diversification from the Dust forum.

Frances and Luke Frahn, Holowiliena Station, Cradock, have a long history in the Flinders Ranges, but they are "quite new to tourism".

They first made steps to having guests when the drought put pressure on their sheep station and shearing business.

To entice visitors, they have embraced their story - with Ms Frahn's family history in the area tracing back to 1852 or "nearly 10 years before Burke met Wills" - and show off the early pioneering buildings, including the store room and the blacksmith shop.

"We've used all the old things to create something new and exciting," she said.

Speaking at the Diversification from the Dust forum, Ms Frahn said the store house was still complete with spices and store books that showed the lifestyle of the early white settlers to the region.

But they also show off elements of their modern-day life, including a glimpse into their children's School of the Air lessons, and invitations to dinner in their own kitchen.

"We show them through our buildings and invite them to dinner - it's nothing special for us but we make it special for them," she said.

"People want to share the stories and our region has that in abundance.

"There are so many stories to be shared."

RELATED:Stories key to selling Flinders tourism

Living with outback history at Holowiliena

Holowiliena gears up for tourism

The step was enhanced by their inclusion in the ABC television show Restoration Australia, which showed them restoring some of the old buildings.

Ms Frahn said within 24 hours of the show airing, they had about 1000 people get in touch, which came as a bit of a surprise.

"We've got people all over Australia who feel they know us," she said.

"When people get in touch with us now, it's to come to Holowiliena."

Ms Frahn said they have also got a store that sells preserves and other "little pieces of Holowiliena" that they can take home.

"We've found who we are and what we do, which is a real strength," she said.

She said this was also a strength for all tourism operators in the Flinders Ranges, with the potential to set up networks to share stories to ensure those working in selling the area, know their history.

"We all believe we live in the most beautiful place in the world, and that's a bias that is OK," she said.

"If we believe in our hearts, we can sell that story."

Start the day with all the big news in agriculture. Sign up here to receive our daily Stock Journal newsletter.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by