Living with outback history at Holowiliena

Living with outback history at Holowiliena

Life & Style
VISIT YESTERYEAR: Frances and Luke Frahn offer an authentic outback experience at Holowiliena Station, which has been in the family since the 1850s.

VISIT YESTERYEAR: Frances and Luke Frahn offer an authentic outback experience at Holowiliena Station, which has been in the family since the 1850s.

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Holowiliena Station provides a look into the sheep industry of the past - and present.

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COME, visit Holowiliena Station, Carrieton, where history lives and the Frahn family is more than happy to let you peek through a window to the past.

Wander the sprawling property first settled in the 1850s by William and Jennett Warwick and now run by their descendants Frances and Luke Frahn after driving 50 kilometres down the long, dirt driveway as hands on the clock swing backwards in time.

The site still has many glimpses of its early days as a bustling sheep property with sleeping quarters for 14 shearers, where a blacksmith shop was operational.

There is an opportunity to marvel at the homestead built in 1855, which remains the heart of the property, catch sight of the Yak chimney, a remnant of the original pioneer hut at the station, and marvel at the ingenuity of old Mr Warwick and his sons, who created all of this.

But it also has modern touches, with it still forging close connections to the agriculture industry.

For the Frahns, who are running a micro tourism project at the station after a forced de-stocking last year, the tourism has proved a welcome project.

"The last three years have been tough," Ms Frahn said.

"As young farmers we knew we wanted to be in sheep.

"I am a wool classer and Luke is a shearer but there is not a farmer in Australia who was not blind-sided by this horror drought and it forced our hand to do something different.

"What we didn't expect was the amount of joy we get out of sharing a little of our lifestyle with others.

"That has been a really pleasant surprise."

Mr Frahn said the authenticity of the experience resonates with visitors.

"We don't offer the five star hotel service but we offer an authentic country greeting and a real farm experience and people thrive on that," he said.

"Most of the buildings have been around for 150 years and were created with the materials found onsite.

"We have used the same traditional approach where we can with any of the renovations.

"We have gathered pine logs, burned lime and collected rocks and it's helping keep the outback history alive."

Visitors, most of whom stay two or three days, can bed down in the small cottage (couple) or the old shearer's quarters (accommodates 14). Alternatively, there are bush camp sites.

"When people visit it is like stepping back in time," Ms Frahn said.

"They come as guests and get to feel like they are part of our lives. We've found people are hungry for an outdoors experience and that's what they get."

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