FRRR set to host grant writing workshop, funding recipients named

FRRR set to host grant writing workshop, funding recipients named

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The Franklin Harbour Community Development Group have previously received funding through the TTTT funding, received $14,237 to commission an Australian artist to paint a mural on the Cowell silos.

The Franklin Harbour Community Development Group have previously received funding through the TTTT funding, received $14,237 to commission an Australian artist to paint a mural on the Cowell silos.

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Community groups across the state are invited to attend a free virtual grant-seeker workshop, hosted by the Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal.

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Community groups across the state are invited to attend a free virtual grant-seeker workshop, hosted by the Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal.

The event, being held next Wednesday, December 9, from 10am to 12pm, will provide information on FRR's current grant programs, including the Tackling Tough Times Together program for drought-affected communities, and the Strengthening Rural Communities program, which includes a bushfire recovery funding stream.

Grant-writing tips will be taught, so groups can be more confident in applying for any of the programs.

Applications for the TTTT and SRC programs are always open, with new funding rounds announced periodically. The next cut-off date for SRC grant applications to be considered is February 23, 2021, while TTTT grants are due on February 25, 2021.

In the most recent round of TTTT funding, 41 projects across the country received funding, totalling nearly $1.5-million.

In SA, groups in Cleve, Copley, Koolunga and Truro have received grants of up to $60,000, while groups in Peterborough, Port Augusta and Beltana have received grants of up to $20,000.

These groups are so resilient and continue to find ways to seed and strengthen, adapt and evolve, and innovate and renew their community. - NINA O'BRIEN

FRRR Disaster Resilience and Recovery Lead Nina O'Brien said the effects of long-term rainfall deficits took time to come back from.

"It takes 18 to 24 months of sustained average rainfalls for communities to finally be able to move beyond the immediate impacts of drought," she said.

"Most communities have had nowhere near this amount of rain - and many have had none at all, which is why communities still need support. This has been made evident by the record value of funding requests we received for this round of TTTT.

"The pandemic has added extra financial strain to communities already dealing with drought, adding to the pressure felt by many local groups, including very fatigued volunteers.

"Community cohesion plays such an important role in drought recovery and COVID-19 restrictions have only exacerbated the social isolation and disengagement that many of these communities have been working hard to tackle.

"In spite of the difficulties, we are inspired by the many local organisations that persistently work to develop the places where they live.

"These groups are so resilient and continue to find ways to seed and strengthen, adapt and evolve, and innovate and renew their community.

"They are finding ways to bring their community together and build that social cohesion, whether it be through community events and festivals, making things more accessible for people living with disability, or by repairing and upgrading facilities to create a safe place for locals to gather."

To register for the grant seeker workshop, click here. To view details on successful TTTT grant applications in the latest funding round, click here.

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