Grain starts to flow in at Lucky Bay

T-Ports looks forward to new harvest season

Grains
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T-Ports has welcomed the first loads of grain at its Lucky Bay site.

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GRAIN: Carrier Jack Kaden (second right) with Kieran Carvill, Jeff Cowan and Tim Gurney from T-Ports and the first load of grain received. Photo: Robert Lang Photography

GRAIN: Carrier Jack Kaden (second right) with Kieran Carvill, Jeff Cowan and Tim Gurney from T-Ports and the first load of grain received. Photo: Robert Lang Photography

T-PORTS is getting ready for its second full harvest season at its Lock and Lucky Bay sites, as the first loads of grain have been received.

The company, which exported the first loads of grain earlier this year using transhipment vessel Lucky Eyre after construction at the port was completed in March, welcomed the first load of Spartacus feed barley from the Kaden family from Mitchellville, near Cowell, on Tuesday.

On top of this, T-Ports has received grain from growers across the area including Cowell, Kimba and Rudall.

T-Ports chief executive officer Kieran Carvill said it was only barley coming in, with wheat receivals expected to get off to a slow start due to the late rain.

He said at this time last year the port facility was still being constructed and finalised so it was exciting to get started with a fully completed and operational port for the new season.

"It's very much a different season to last season when we were still in construction and were still in preparation," he said.

"We've been really happy with the massive support from growers and to give growers a solution to their profitability on their farm."

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Mr Carvill said T-Ports expected to see the first shipment of grain for this season by the end of November followed by another within the first half of December.

With the port and bunker site at Lucky Bay and bunker facility at Lock, T-Ports has aimed to provide alternative grain storage and export options for growers on the Eyre Peninsula.

Mr Carvill said T-Ports had been looking to support local farmers, which included providing $3 in shares per every tonne of grain delivered over the first four years to farmers who registered during an initial expression of interest phase in 2017.

He said farmers were looking at how the competition would benefit their business going forward.

"They are looking holistically at the advantages of competition and what it can do for their farm model," he said.

As to T-Ports' Wallaroo port development, Mr Carvill said the company was aiming to start construction this year to be in operation for season 2021, while the company was also looking into building another site on the EP.

The story Grain starts to flow in at Lucky Bay first appeared on Port Lincoln Times.

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