Riverland program sees Coolatai weed contained

Riverland program sees Coolatai weed contained

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A coordinated control program to prevent infestations of Coolatai grass has reduced incursions in the Riverland region.

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A coordinated control program to prevent infestations of Coolatai grass has reduced incursions in the Riverland region.

While the weed is not widespread across the Riverland, it is a highly invasive grass which can become dominant ground cover, with potential to spread into national parks and irrigated areas.

A perennial tussock grass, the weed can grow up to two metres tall and can quickly establish during summer months, producing sticky seeds which are spread by wind, water and vehicles travelling through infested sites.

Natural Resources SA Murray Darling Basin district manager Hannah Spronk said the control approach has focused on specific known areas where the grass has been found, in order to prevent a further increase in the size of infestations, and reduce the risk of spread.

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"Multiple control methods are being used by the Natural Resources SAMDB Riverland District Team to prevent the spread of this weed, including removal of seed heads, removal and deep burial of individual plants and herbicide application," she said.

Coolatai grass is typically found along transport pathways, such as beside highways, truck stops and pull over bays, where seed run off from passing vehicles can accumulate.

Any sightings of the invasive weed should be reported to Berri Natural Resources Centre on 8580 1800.

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