Balance not right between ag, mines: Davis

Balance not right between ag, mines: Davis

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WATER WOES: Kym Davis, Woodside, is facing increased dust, noise and traffic less than 150m from his house with the mine base to be located just behind these trees, but his main concern is water security.

WATER WOES: Kym Davis, Woodside, is facing increased dust, noise and traffic less than 150m from his house with the mine base to be located just behind these trees, but his main concern is water security.

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MORE balance is needed between the often conflicting demands of agriculture and mining, Woodside local Kym Davis says.

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MORE balance is needed between the often conflicting demands of agriculture and mining, Woodside local Kym Davis says.

Mr Davis and wife Kirsten run a small vineyard and Angus cattle herd just 150 metres from the proposed Terramin Bird-in-Hand mine.

The entrance to the underground mine will be just across the road from his property and is expected to operate constantly.

"There will be lots of trucks, noise and dust," he said.

"But apart from all the immediate and negative impacts on our lives and local business - and we do get a lot of tourists - the biggest issue, this is sitting under the aquifer that is protected and fully allocated.

"They will be mining 150m through an aquifer we all rely on."

He said Terramin had conducted a trial on the aquifer that caused the water level on his bore to alter by as much as 10 metres.

"That was a relatively small test," he said.

"This is a high risk for us. All the dams around here are empty so we're all highly dependent on bores.

"We're a state that can't afford to play with its water resources."

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Mr Davis said the benefits of a five-year mine should be balanced against the nearly 20 local residents and major agricultural, horticultural, viticultural and tourism businesses nearby.

"We've got a good brand and good future, which this could put in jeopardy," he said.

"It wouldn't take much for word to get around that it's dusty and noisy so let's go to McLaren Vale or the Barossa instead.

"And the water from the Mount Lofty Ranges supplies 60 per cent of Adelaide water - it doesn't only impact us."

Mr Davis joined the rally on the steps of Parliament House last week, hoping to express to the government the importance to getting this legislation right.

He would like the government to look interstate to find the right protections for landholders.

He said other states had better protection for landholders in place.

"I'm not against mining but there is a time and a place," he said.

"It's a big state but only 4 per cent is arable so why mess it up?"

Terramin chief executive officer Richard Taylor said the mine's "science-based approach" and "small footprint" was designed to minimise the impact.

"Our science-based approach and small footprint project is designed to minimise any impact on water.

"We own the land and the water rights and will not be using water in any of our processes at Woodside," he said.

Terramin said it had also worked with its own environmental professionals and expert, independent scientific and engineering consultants extensively.

Terramin said it had also invested heavily in visual amenity and landscaping studies to minimise the site footprint.

"It is Terramin's goal to contribute positively to the wider Hills community and where possible work to improve the environmental condition of the catchment," a company statement said.

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