Teachers gain insight into EP ag

Teachers gain insight into EP ag


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THE state's agricultural teachers received some insight into the industry on Eyre Peninsula as it held its biennial conference at Cleve.

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THE state's agricultural teachers received some insight into the industry on Eyre Peninsula as it held its biennial conference at Cleve.

Agricultural Teachers Association of SA president Sue Pratt said the trip included several highlights, such as insight into Sim Farm at Cleve, tours of local farming and aquaculture operations and the chance for established and brand new teachers to meet.

This year about 25 schools sent representatives to the event.

Former Sims Farm teacher and ATASA executive member Scott Cram organised the trip to Cleve to allow EP teachers a chance to participate without major travel.

Ms Pratt said the focus of this conference was on industry visits to make the most of the many different aspects of agriculture on offer within the Cleve and Franklin Harbour regions.

Because of that, as well as the reduced numbers due to distance, the association's usual biennial general meeting was not held during the conference but will instead be held next month through email.

Ms Pratt said the main focus of the virtual meeting would be re-electing the ATASA executive for the coming years, consulting on curriculum.

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She said the Royal Adelaide Show was also a regular discussion topic, even more so this year with planned changes to the school steer competition timing.

The meeting is also a chance to reinvigorate the hub program, which works to create regional networks to allow teachers to share ideas and support new staff.

Ms Pratt said another topic for discussion would be ATASA's continued involvement with the Australia-wide National Association of Agricultural Educators.

"Logistically it can be difficult for the state bodies to work together, so we will be looking at how we can improve that or even if we continue our involvement with NAAE," she said.

Ms Pratt said the number of agricultural students were climbing, but the industry was "desperately short" of qualified agricultural teachers to meet this demand.

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