Never before seen territory: The record-breaking animals of 2021

Record-breaking territory for all breeds in 2021

Studstock
This year was one of record breaking heights for the seed stock industry.

This year was one of record breaking heights for the seed stock industry.

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Seed stock animals reached new heights in 2021 as multiple breed and species records tumble.

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Hearing a stud animal make a six figure bid has almost become the new normal. Take the NCC Brahman bull sale on Tuesday in Queensland.

Known for holding the record for the highest price bull to ever sell in Australia, this year seven bulls sold for six figures and attendees were still wanting more.

It's been a year for breed records to tumble across the seed stock industry. It took just a matter of minutes for some to break. In the last three months alone, bull and ram prices have reached levels no one could ever see coming.

In the grandstands people were left crying tears of joy as names were etched into the history books but some agents say the biggest rewards are still yet to come.

Nutrien stud stock agent John Settree, Dubbo said people have cash and confidence, and the long range forecast for the next year and two is positive.

Nutrien stud stock agents Brad Wilson and John Settree, both of Dubbo. Mr Settree said people have cash and confidence, and the long range forecast for the next year and two is positive.

Nutrien stud stock agents Brad Wilson and John Settree, both of Dubbo. Mr Settree said people have cash and confidence, and the long range forecast for the next year and two is positive.

"That and the best of the best genetics are coming through at the moment," Mr Settree said.

"Another thing is people that were paying $6-7000 for a bull are now having to pay $12-15,000, and the females are going to be so much better for these people in two years.

"I hope because of this, they will be encouraged to keep spending more money on their bull purchases because they will see the value in quality every time they see their cows."

The most expensive of this year's highlights was the $280,000 record-breaking Millah Murrah Rocket Man R38 who was sold to Brooklana Angus, Dorrigo, at the Thompson family's Millah Murrah Angus bull sale at Bathurst on September 3.

The $280,000 Australian Angus record top-priced bull with Elders agent Andrew Bickford, Bathurst, auctioneer Paul Dooley, Tamworth and Millah Murrah's Ross and Dimity Thompson and their daughters Millie, Olivia and Twiggy.

The $280,000 Australian Angus record top-priced bull with Elders agent Andrew Bickford, Bathurst, auctioneer Paul Dooley, Tamworth and Millah Murrah's Ross and Dimity Thompson and their daughters Millie, Olivia and Twiggy.

At this same sale another bull, Millah Murrah Rembrandt R48, also reached never before seen territory breaking the $200,000 mark as he sold for $240,000 to ABS Global Australia, JT Angus, Scone, Woonallee Simmentals, South Australia and Whangara Angus, New Zealand, just three lots later.

These sires exceeded the previous record set in July when Ben and Wendy Mayne of Texas Angus, Warialda sold Texas Iceman R725 for $225,000 to Mackas Angus, Salt Ash. Millah Murrah's draft of 118 bulls sold for an Australian all breeds record average of $34,221.

It is also believed to be a world-record average for a bull sale at $25,322 USD, ahead of NCC Brahmans in 2017 where 76 bulls averaged $26,915 AUD ($20,025 USD) and US Angus stud Schaff Angus Valley in 2015 where 487 yearling bulls averaged $20,025 AUD ($18,440 USD).

Auctioneer Paul Dooley of Paul Dooley Pty Ltd, Tamworth, who has sold several of the record-breaking animals this year said it had been an exciting experience to be apart of the sales and share in the celebrations and achievements of people, many of which are long-time friends and clients.

Mr Dooley said the record prices have been fuelled by great optimism in agriculture which has been driven by the excellent season and commodity markets.

Mr Dooley said the record prices have been fuelled by great optimism in agriculture which has been driven by the excellent season and commodity markets.

Mr Dooley said the record prices have been fuelled by great optimism in agriculture which has been driven by the excellent season and commodity markets.

"Our commodity markets are a driver of everything and they're strong - commercial cattle, sheep and lambs are all in record territory," he said.

"Many of the record stud animals are being bought by seedstock producers that are optimistic about the next number of years they will reap rewards from having those top animals within their herds.

"It has been an unbelievably exciting time to be in the business, and I am very optimistic for next year to be good too - while it keeps raining, the commodity markets will stay very strong. I expect the autumn run to be just as strong."

On Tuesday, another bull cracked the $200,000 mark, with Brahman bull NCC Perry sold for $200,000 to 2AM Brahmans, Dingo, Qld.

It took 35 years for the previous Hereford record of $120,000, set by Inverary Dominator D56, to be broken but Injemira Redford J006 Q287 smashed it when he was knocked down for the new record high price of $160,000 to a syndicate made up of ABS Global Australia, South Australian stud Ardno and Vielun Pastoral Company, Mudgee.

Lawsons Rocky R4010 made his mark selling for an Angus and Australian all breeds record yearling top price of $130,000 to Dunoon Angus, Holbrook, Gilmandyke Angus, Orange, Knowla Livestock, Moppy, and Kelly Angus, Yea, Vic.

The $130,000 record-breaking yearling bull with buyer syndicate representative Peter McNamara, Gilmandyke Angus, Orange, and Lawsons Angus cooperator herd breeders Vince and Debbie Rheinberger, Boorowa.

The $130,000 record-breaking yearling bull with buyer syndicate representative Peter McNamara, Gilmandyke Angus, Orange, and Lawsons Angus cooperator herd breeders Vince and Debbie Rheinberger, Boorowa.

This trend of record high prices follows much of what has been seen in the commercial markets, with the eastern young cattle indicator (EYCI) reaching new record heights of 1075.8 cents a kilogram (carcase weight) on Tuesday and saleyards breaking their personal best mark on several occasions.

A big feat for females was seen within the Speckle Park breed, with the world record broken three times in five months. Most recently the Humphries family of Wattle Grove Speckle Park, Oberon, sold Wattle Grove P503 Cara S101, for a Speckle Park breed world record of $75,000 to Ivery Downs Cattle Co, Colinton, Qld, on October 16.

This record high price surpasses the previous benchmark of $70,000 just a week prior at the Three Way Speckle Park Stage One Dispersal Sale, Nundle, and the earlier $57,000 top set by Jackungah Speckle Park at the Blueprint Opportunity Sale, Pine Lodge, Vic.

In the sheep industry, ram prices have matched that of bulls. Two impressive feats include the $5.628 million industry record sale gross achieved across 398 Australian Whites sold by the Gilmore family of Tattykeel Australian Whites, Black Springs, and the $1.939 million Australian Merino record gross achieved when Kerin Poll Merinos, Yeoval, 550 rams in the largest ever offering of Merinos on September 24.

The $1.939 million Australian Merino record gross achieved when Kerin Poll Merinos, Yeoval, 550 rams in the largest ever offering of Merinos on September 24.

The $1.939 million Australian Merino record gross achieved when Kerin Poll Merinos, Yeoval, 550 rams in the largest ever offering of Merinos on September 24.

Six figure price tags for rams also was on the cards for 2021, with three Australian White rams pushing the limits and creating new heights. They included the $165,000 new record top priced all breeds meat sheep ram, Tattykeel 'White Gold' ET 200131, his full brother Tattykeel 'XXXX Gold' ET 201145 which sold for $120,000 and Tattykeel Anzac 63 sold privately for $150,000.

Elders Deniliquin manager, Clyde McKenzie, said his clients were not phased by the possibility of having to pay more for their replacement rams prior to the spring selling season in the Riverina.

"We expected it to be dearer," he explained when describing the external influences such as season and commodity prices which have lifted producers' hopes for increased financial returns.

"With sheep and lamb prices at a high level and a solid wool market, it is not surprising buyers are prepared to pay more for their rams. A lot of people realised they would have to pay between $500 and $1000 more per head than last year."

Mr McKenzie noted some are buying the higher priced Merino rams and joining them to a selection of their best home-bred ewes and keeping a few rams. But overall, the increased demand is coming off the back of producers slowly increasing ewe numbers.

"I'm seeing some people are keeping back their older ewes for another year because of the good season and joining them to British Breeds," he said.

The Lachlan Merino $18,000 sale-topper with Nutrien stud stock agents Brad Wilson and John Settree, Margot, Glen, Campbell and Mitch (kneeling) Rubie of Lachlan Merinos, Warroo and Elders stud stock agents Paul Jameson and Scott Thrift, Dubbo.

The Lachlan Merino $18,000 sale-topper with Nutrien stud stock agents Brad Wilson and John Settree, Margot, Glen, Campbell and Mitch (kneeling) Rubie of Lachlan Merinos, Warroo and Elders stud stock agents Paul Jameson and Scott Thrift, Dubbo.

At the time of print the highest averaging Merino sale for 2021 was Poll Boonoke which averaged $4825. Other stud highlights include Lachlan $4818, Egelabra $4791, Bundilla $4767, Mumblebone $4573, Tallawong $4510,Hazeldean $4412, Bogo $4220, Yarrawonga $4123, and Tara Park $4062.

Meanwhile it has always been said the value of a good working dog matches the salary of a station hand, and this year we saw people pay close to that.

A Kelpie dog called 'Hoover' offered by David Lee, Edenhope, Vic, set a new world record price for a Kelpie when he sold for $35,200 to a North East Victoria sheep and cattle grazier during the online Casterton Working Dog Auction on June 12. He was part of 51 lots which grossed $298,600, averaging another record of $7753 per dog.

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The story Never before seen territory: The record-breaking animals of 2021 first appeared on The Land.

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