A Ferme royal tradition continues for beef family

A Ferme royal tradition

Royal Adelaide Show
FAMILY: Jenny, Murray Ferme, Angus Andersen, Daniel, Ainslee and Nikki Ferme. Front: Nate Andersen, Colby, Paige and Madison Blacksell.

FAMILY: Jenny, Murray Ferme, Angus Andersen, Daniel, Ainslee and Nikki Ferme. Front: Nate Andersen, Colby, Paige and Madison Blacksell.

Aa

ROYAL REWIND: The 2016 Royal Adelaide Show was a family affair for Murray and Jenny Ferme, with three generations involved.

Aa

THE 2016 Royal Adelaide Show was a family affair for Murray and Jenny Ferme, Crystal Brook, with three generations involved.

But the family member that stole the show was a pristine 103-year-old trophy, proudly displayed by the family, and won by Murrays great-grandfather at the Wayville event.

The second Barker Brothers Challenge cup, presented to the champion Clydesdale sire or draft mare or filly more than two-years-old, was won by Wandearahs Albert Weir Davidson in 1914, 1917 and 1918 with a horse named Glengowan.

The trophy is kept at the Ferme family home after being passed down through the generations.

When my grandmother died, my dad inherited it and it has since been given to me, Murray said.

The trophy represents a strong showing tradition for the Ferme family, with Murray a regular exhibitor of Charolais cattle from his Gum View stud at Crystal Brook.

After being a frequent visitor to the show as a child with his Illawarra-breeding grandparents and father, Murray first showed cattle in 1995.

The stud continued to exhibit until 2006 and, after a layoff, made a return in 2014 when Charolais was the feature breed.

While hes proud of his cattle, Murray says it is the people that make the show special.

The people you get to meet from throughout Australia is the best part about the show scene, he said.

The family have also exhibited at the Royal Melbourne Show, including last month.

One year still sticks out for Murray.

In 2001 he took bulls to a sale in Tamworth, NSW, while his children exhibited at Adelaide.

I got the best price for a bull in Tamworth and they won supreme exhibit in the Charolais, he said.

Murray said the stud had already won champion Charolais cow at Adelaide, but had one more goal.

Weve never won champion bull we won reserve champion last year so were working on the bulls to see if we can win the lot, he said.

RELATED READING:Students learn judging tips, tricks at inaugural education day

Ringside at the beef judging at Adelaide

The Ferme family showing legacy shows no sign of abating, with Murrays grandkids travelling to Adelaide and Melbourne in 2016 year to help out.

Three generations of Fermes were involved at Adelaide in September, leading in the showring, and preparing and looking after the cattle.

Its good to offer to the kids, whether they excel in it or not, Murray said. They get a lot of fun out of it.

Murray took a bull and three heifers from his Gum View Charolais stud to this years show, which he said was an enjoyable experience for the entire family.

The Fermes run 150 cattle and sell 10 to 15 bulls a year, 29 years after the stud was formed from humble beginnings.

I bought a cheap bull for $100, Murray said.

I went to buy the next bull and it was too dear so I thought I better start breeding them.

I bought three cows and we produced our first calves in 1987. From there, it just kept on growing.

This article was originally published in October, 2016.

  • Start the day with all the big news in agriculture. Sign up here to receive our daily Stock Journal newsletter.
Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by