Equator son adds heat to JB Angus bull sale

JB Angus stud hits $8500 high in online sale

Studstock
ONLINE SUCCESS: JB Angus stud principal Jock Hislop sold 21 of 26 bulls in his third online helmsman sale.

ONLINE SUCCESS: JB Angus stud principal Jock Hislop sold 21 of 26 bulls in his third online helmsman sale.

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STEWART Range based JB stud continues to build its reputation in the Angus seedstock industry with its third annual online bull sale easily its best result.

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SALE SUMMARY

                   2020            2019

Offered    26                 15

Sold           21                12

Top            $8500          $7250(2)

Av              $5226          $4500

STEWART Range based JB stud continues to build its reputation in the Angus seedstock industry with its third annual online bull sale easily its best result.

By the end of the three-day helmsman selling period last week 21 of 26 bulls had sold for a $5226 average- up $726 on 2019's sale.

Buyers came from across the South East and as far afield as Coffin Bay on the Eyre Peninsula chasing both new and proven Australian and United States genetics.

Topping the sale was lot 2, JB Legit P111 which made $8500.

The June 2018-drop son of Alpine Equator L004 which sold to Old Fairview, Lucindale, weighed 760 kilograms.

Lot 5, JB Investment P47, the first son of Sitz Investment 660Z to be offered in SA ,made $7750 and was also among the four bulls which Old Fairview bought.

An embryo flush brother to lot 5 in lot 4, JB Investment P81, made $7000 to Jimbadeen Props, Coonawarra.

The first drop of Coonamble Junior J266 sons were also in demand with lot 10, JB Junior P59 making $7000 to Chris Tierney, Naracoorte.

Also among the volume buyers Michael Mattei, Williup, Hynam, secured four bulls.

Stud principal Jock Hislop said he had no plans to change the successful sale format which gives buyers the opportunity to move up and down the catalogue without the pressure of operating at auction.

"It was very pleasing to lift the average from $4500 but also have a lot of repeat buyers and some new clients through Southern Australian Livestock," he said.

He said he would gradually build his sale numbers as the herd grew, helped by the purchase of five females at the Anvil Angus dispersal sale in Vic last November.

"Our philosophy first and most importantly is to produce a sound bull that will produce sound females," Mr Hislop said.

"Then we look to make sure the maternal function is there- nice laid in shoulders and width of hips and then we push the performance with EBVs.

"If there is any compromise it is with the EBVs."

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