Bushfires a stark reminder of nature's power

Bushfires a stark reminder of nature's power

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I will always have enormous admiration and respect for our volunteer firefighters, both those at the Country Fire Service and those who front up with their own fire units.

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Mother Nature is a force to be reckoned with.

The fires that burnt in various locations across the state last week, including at Yorketown, as well as the bushfire crisis seen in NSW are a harsh reminder of that - not that we needed it.

People's fortunes can change in an instant - all it takes is one lightning strike, a spark from an electric fence, a power network fault or, worst of all, the work of an arsonist.

And even when it seems the risk posed by a blaze has diminished, weather conditions can change dramatically and the situation can escalate all too quickly.

Related reading:Lessons from the past help with YP fire recovery

From what we've heard, the outcome of the Yorketown fire could easily have been far more serious, given how close it got to the Edithburgh township, and considering only the coast could stop its march south.

I will always have enormous admiration and respect for our volunteer firefighters, both those at the Country Fire Service and those who front up with their own fire units.

Where the vast majority of us would turn and run the other way to safety, they put themselves at risk to defend our loved ones, our towns and our properties. They aren't paid to do it. They aren't made to do it. Instead, they put their lives on the line because they know they can make a difference.

A pat on the back must also go to all involved in Monday's information session at Yorketown, where three individuals affected by the 2015 Pinery fire shared the knowledge they gained from their difficult experience with southern YP landholders.

Related reading:Pinery fire memorial launched on fourth anniversary

Such an event is proof that some good can still come from the worst situations. Sharing information on how those affected can help their land, businesses and, most importantly, themselves, recover is sure to have enormous benefits.

The Pinery blaze occurred at an almost identical time four years ago, and landowners faced a long and difficult summer trying to stop charred topsoil blowing into the distance. The quick thinking in getting Ben Marshman, Adrian McCabe and Michael Brougham to address Yorketown landholders less than a week after the blaze broke out will help give farmers the tools and knowledge to begin the recovery process.

With summer arriving today, it's a timely reminder of the need to do all we can to prepare for the threat posed by fires. Time spent developing a bushfire plan can help keep you and your loved ones safe. Don't leave it until it's too late.

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