GM disallowance motion to go to vote

GM disallowance motion to go to vote

Cropping
JUDGEMENT DAY: The parliament is set to vote on a motion to disallow changes to GM Moratorium regulation changes.

JUDGEMENT DAY: The parliament is set to vote on a motion to disallow changes to GM Moratorium regulation changes.

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THE proposed changes to SA's GM crop moratorium will hang on a vote in parliament on November 27, after Greens MLC Mark Parnell tabled a motion to disallow regulations that would lift the moratorium on mainland SA on December 1.

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THE proposed changes to SA's GM crop moratorium will hang on a vote in Parliament on November 27, after Greens MLC Mark Parnell tabled a motion to disallow regulations that would lift the moratorium on mainland South Australia on December 1.

In parliament on Thursday last week, Mr Parnell said the Greens would move to disallow the regulations that would lift the moratorium on the cultivation of genetically modified crops in SA, other than Kangaroo Island, and they were doing so for a number of reasons.

"The first reason is that, less than two years ago, this Parliament decided to extend the moratorium that banned GM crops across the entire state until September 2025," Mr Parnell said.

"The bill passed by both houses of parliament was done with the understanding that any future decision to lift the moratorium could only be done with the support of both houses of parliament and by legislation."

Mr Parnell accused the state government of going down the "sneaky path" of changing the scope of the regulations, while leaving the moratorium expiry date in place, and has called for them to introduce an amendment bill so the changes can be debated in parliament.

RELATED READING:Greens introduce Bill to reaffirm GM moratorium

Mr Parnell cited many reasons not to lift SA's GM moratorium, including the need to protect SA's clean, green reputation for marketing and economic benefits, prices disparities between GM and non-GM crops in other states, as well as risk of contamination of non-GM crops by their GM counterparts.

"I implore both the Labor Party and SA-Best to continue to stand firm on retaining SA's GM-free status and support the motion for disallowance of these regulations so that we can retain the moratorium across SA," Mr Parnell said.

Mr Parnell has indicated that he will bring the motion to vote on November 27, four days prior to the proposed commencement of the government's new regulations on December 1.

"Farmers need certainty about whether or not they can start growing GM crops next season and the decision of this chamber prior to the commencement of those regulations will provide that certainty for farmers," he said.

SELECT COMMITTEE SPLIT

Greens MLC Mark Parnell's disallowance motion follows the handing down of the report from the Select Committee on the Moratorium on the Cultivation of Genetically Modified Crops in South Australia.

RELATED READING:GM hurdles loom large

As predicted, the committee was split with Advance SA MLC John Darley and Liberal MLC John Dawkins of the view that the moratorium be lifted on mainland SA and retained for Kangaroo Island.

"There was evidence that reinforced my view that the farming sector in South Australia, which is highly regarded around the world and has been for decades, deserves the opportunity to have the choice of growing genetically modified crops within their rotation schedule," Mr Dawkins said in parliament.

"It is something that happens everywhere else in Australia and certainly the world has not ended."

Mr Dawkins said the committee heard great evidence of the ability of the grain handling sector to segregate grains and segregate different varieties of grain.

Mr Darley said various representatives from the agriculture sector had contended that if the state was to progress and resume its former high rank standing in agricultural science, GM technology must be available.

Mr Parnell retains his position that the current moratorium remain until it expires on September 1, 2025 as approved by the last parliament and a review of the operation of the moratorium be undertaken twelve months prior to its expiry.

Labor MLC Emily Bourke proposed the Minister for Primary Industries "engage in open and transparent consultation with primary producers and the wider food and wine industry in order to develop a GM Moratorium Action Plan as we move towards the 2025 target".

The committee agreed the following recommendations be adopted:

  1. That the Minister work with primary producers and the wider food and wine industry to outline key steps and milestones to enhance marketing opportunities for primary producers and the value adding chain.
  2. That the State Government work with all relevant government departments to support and provide marketing assistance to South Australian primary producers, the wider food and wine industry, relevant representative bodies, associations and industry groups which want to remain GM free.
  3. That the Minister ensures that a suitable and widely recognised non-GM label is accepted and used by South Australia's primary producers and wider food and wine industry which want to remain GM free and have that status recognised locally, nationally and internationally.

CropLife Australia commended the select committee for their work in reviewing the moratorium, saying the plant science industry was pleased the removal of the moratorium received support from committee members, as opposed to delaying its removal for several more years or keeping it altogether.

"Removing the GM moratorium is not about forcing farmers to grow GM crops," CropLife Australia chief executive officer Matthew Cossey said.

"This is about all farmers simply having a choice to grow whichever approved crops - including GM crops - best suit their land and business model so that no farmer loses out."

"The 2017 decision to extend the GM moratorium until 2025 was a baseless and crass political maneuver.

"Any delay to removing SA's GM moratorium serves no purpose and would only deny the state's farming sector access to important innovations.

"The facts are clear - SA growers are missing out on the environmental, agronomic and financial benefits of growing approved GM crops."

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