New quad regulations 'make sense'

New quad regulations 'make sense'

Machinery
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Torrens Vale dairyfarmer Wes Hurrell said it "made sense" for roll-over protection devices to be installed on new quad bikes.

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Protection vital: Wes Hurrell, Torrens Vale, has had two quad bike accidents, which he said would have been less severe if his bike had roll-over protection.

Protection vital: Wes Hurrell, Torrens Vale, has had two quad bike accidents, which he said would have been less severe if his bike had roll-over protection.

TORRENS Vale dairyfarmer Wes Hurrell, Rockwella Farm Holsteins, said it "made sense" for roll-over protection devices to be installed on new quad bikes.

He said no one planned to have accidents on quad bikes, but the devices could be potentially life-saving if a crash was to occur.

"It may not stop people going to emergency, but it may stop the serious injuries and fatalities," he said.

"I'm surprised the motorbike companies aren't embracing it."

Mr Hurrell has had two quad bike accidents on his farm - one 15 years ago and one 10 years ago, the latter which broke his back.

"(The crash) wouldn't have been a problem if I'd had a roll-over bar, the way it went, the bike rolled right on top of me," he said.

"With a roll cage it would've been stopped, or fallen to the side."

Mr Hurrell said it was important to be as safe as possible on quad bikes, and avoid dangerous situations, especially when on hilly terrain.

"If you have to go to a spot that's too steep or too awkward, put the handbrake on, get off the bike and walk there, it's as simple as that," he said.

"Our farm is quite hilly, and the two roll-overs I had were on really steep terrain, I shouldn't have been there."

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Mr Hurrell said laws to fit existing quad bikes with roll bar protection was "the next step".

"If protection on new quad bikes is mandatory, I imagine it won't be long before the old ones have to be fitted too, especially if the data shows them (the roll-over bars) to be effective," he said.

"It doesn't matter if it's a new bike or a 10-year-old bike, if you're doing something wrong, it's going to hurt you at some stage."

Mr Hurrell said there was work to be done to ensure the protection was as effective as possible.

"There is no point putting a roll bar on a back tray that's flimsy, as soon as you roll the bike it'll break off, and that will defeat the purpose," he said.

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