Education choices open many doors

Education choices open many doors

Agribusiness
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The education system in Australia is really quite good, particularly in comparison to some less well-off countries.

Aa
IMPORTANT CHOICE: Most Australians have plenty of choice when it comes to education options, although in more remote areas this is not the case.

IMPORTANT CHOICE: Most Australians have plenty of choice when it comes to education options, although in more remote areas this is not the case.

The education system in Australia is really quite good, particularly in comparison to some less well-off countries.

In some countries, easy access to education is just a pipedream.

Last week I got to speak to a group of people about a trip to Nepal I did in 2016.

It was good to relive the memories, and get some of the old pictures out to share with them.

The trekking was fantastic, as was the hospitality shown by the super friendly Nepalese.

The most significant observation I made, though, was the lack of basic education offered, particularly for girls.

We do live in the "lucky country", as we have many ways and means to access education.

In Australia the system is starkly different - although there is a huge disparity between the relative wealth of both countries.

We are so fortunate to have such choice. Some areas, particularly in the outback, have limited choices for education.

The bulk of the population has the option of choosing public or private schooling or anywhere in between.

Families make their own choices, and that is their right to do so.

Another feature of the Australian system is access to further education.

This has changed a lot through the years.

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For generations past, access to education was more limited, especially for those who were from a regional area, although this is not so much the case today.

The pathways into further education are many and varied.

This may mean university or Tafe, it could mean short training courses, or professional or personal development training. A lot of training is accessible online.

There are numerous courses tailored for agribusinesses. These may be industry-related, regarding communication, or on the mindset needed to run a successful agribusiness.

I have seen some agribusinesses transformed after accessing this training.

There are plenty of examples of farmers or other people changing careers.

This change may or may not have necessitated further education - it all depends on what the individual is trying to achieve.

University education is far more accessible now. I am living proof of this.

I was recently speaking to someone who said her brother had been a plumber for many years.

He then decided to get his pilot's licence, and after much training, and many years, has just become a Qantas pilot.

For those interested, university education is far more accessible now. I am living proof of this.

There is nothing particularly remarkable about my story, and this pathway is open to anyone if that is what they want.

I left school after year 11. Year 12 wasn't on the agenda for me or any of my mates; we all went home on the farm and were more than happy to do so.

I completed my Commerce degree via mature aged entry when I was 34.

Related reading:Ag looks risky to those on the outside

This was all done by correspondence back in the day.

Even my exams were sat upstairs in the office at the local rural merchandise store, as the owner was a Justice of the Peace, and was eligible to supervise my exams.

At the age of 53 I am halfway through a Law degree.

While I do this on campus, I rarely attend lectures, as they are all recorded and easily accessible.

The take home message is we do live in the "lucky country", as we have many ways and means to access education.

It all depends on what goals and aspirations you have. If you want to do it, you can.

Aa

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