Lessons to learn from quiet achievers

Lessons to learn from quiet achievers

Agribusiness
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THROUGH the years I have come across a few people that I would call quiet achievers. Driving past their driveways, there is nothing out of the ordinary - except for how neat and tidy everything is.

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THROUGH the years I have come across a few people that I would call quiet achievers.

Driving past their driveways, there is nothing out of the ordinary - except for how neat and tidy everything is. You can tell a lot about how an agribusiness is run by driving up the track to the sheds.

I have been very fortunate to know some of these quiet achievers. They do not seek the limelight, and just go about their business.

This column is an amalgam of a few of these people that I have met across the journey, one in particular.

Their work does not go unnoticed, and they do have admirers. I am unashamedly one of these. I learn a lot by asking questions and observing successful business owners.

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The vehicle they drive might have a few kilometres on the clock. The header might be a few models old - although it will be invariably be fitted with the latest technology. The fences will be in top nick, and the tracks rubbled.

These are the same people that have a remarkably accurate budget scribbled down in the back of an Elders notebook. They can rattle off the net profit of the canola from 2016, and the test results of the latest wool clip, off the top of their head.

They are quite unassuming in nature, and nothing they do seems much of a fuss. They are also generally very involved in community activities, and again, this goes under the radar.

I am in the privileged position of seeing the numbers achieved by some of these agribusiness owners, and that is when the truth is revealed. I never cease to be amazed by how profitable these agribusinesses are year after year. Without even trying they are in the top percentile of performers on most measures.

To be honest, they do not even know they are in the cohort of top producers, and quite frankly, probably do not really care. Their exceptional outcome is almost by default - but not really.

A trait all top performers share is passion. This will get people a long way in their chosen profession. While the vast majority of my clients are agribusiness owners, I see the same trait in all top business owners.

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I could talk to these business owners all day. After spending time with them you feel quite energised. I normally just ask a few questions and sit back and listen.

My experience is that inspired, passionate business owners cannot wait to tell you all about their business.

Some people fall into their profession, others are destined to end up there. It doesn't matter either way - it is what you do with the opportunity that matters most.

From my observations, it is the people with real passion that ultimately are successful. They generally do not focus on the money. They are just really good at what they do, run a really good business, and generally end up being financially successful - no big surprises there.

All I can say is well done to these quiet achievers. Keep up the good work.

  • Details: michael@bagshawagriconsulting.com.au
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