Where the money is going: Drought charities respond

Where the money is going: Drought charities respond


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Drought charities' distribution of funds and resources has been in the spotlight lately. Photo: Lucy Kinbacher

Drought charities' distribution of funds and resources has been in the spotlight lately. Photo: Lucy Kinbacher

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Drought charities outline how they are spending their funds.

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THE DISTRIBUTION of funds, fodder and other resources by major drought charities has been in the headlines over the past fortnight, with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profit Commission investigating two organisations.

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Earlier in the year Fairfax Agricultural Media contacted a number of prominent drought charities to see how their funds were working.

Of the six contacted, CWA, Rotary / NFF and the Salvation Army gave detailed accounts of how they were allocating their funds, while Rural Aid / Drought Aid, Drought Angels and Aussie Helpers did not respond at the time.

Danica Leys, chief executive of the Country Women’s Association of NSW, said her organisation was focusing on a drought grants scheme to run throughout NSW.

“We are funding a drought aid grants scheme that is focused on assisting farmers and farming dependent businesses with household expenses, with 100 per cent of funds raised going to drought relief,” Ms Ley said.

“The CWA does not take any administrative costs out.”

She said full details of the scheme were available on the CWA website.

The Salvation Army said its aim was to provide financial, emotional and practical support for communities in need of help.

As of September, a Salvation Army spokesperson confirmed the organisation had 37 frontline workers in drought affected areas working with those needing assistance.

In addition to providing this face-to-face support, The Salvation Army has also established a 24/7 emergency assistance hotline offering support to farmers impacted by the drought.

The spokesperson said the Salvation Army was working towards ensuring no more than 10pc of funds raised were used on operational costs.

The NFF is working with Rotary to raise funds for drought relief.

A spokesperson said it was intended that the donations will be used for a variety of needs including: fodder, water, household expenses and access to health and financial services.

In order to assess areas of need, the NFF convened a meeting in Canberra of the various charities and drought programs that are providing on-the-ground relief to farmers and communities.

The story Where the money is going: Drought charities respond first appeared on Farm Online.

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