Funding boost for SA wine tourism

Funding boost for SA wine tourism


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TOURISM BOOST: Agriculture and Water Resources assistant minister Anne Ruston and Bird In Hand general manager Jared Stringer have welcomed $2 million federal and state government funding to boost SA wine tourism.

TOURISM BOOST: Agriculture and Water Resources assistant minister Anne Ruston and Bird In Hand general manager Jared Stringer have welcomed $2 million federal and state government funding to boost SA wine tourism.

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A $2 million funding boost is aiming to bring an additional 10,000 SA wine tourism visitors across the next four years.

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MORE than a third of international visitors to SA visit at least one of the state’s wine regions, and the number is set to expand thanks to a federal and state funding boost.

The federal and state governments have pledged $2 million as part of a commitment to supercharge wine exports and tourism.

Announced on Friday, the funding aims to generate an additional 10,000 international wine tourism visitors to the state across the next four years, and promote SA wines across the world.

Making the announcement at Bird in Hand Winery, Assistant Agriculture and Water Resources Minister Anne Ruston said SA was the “engine room” for Australian wine.

“When tourists go home, we know they actively search for the brand (they have experienced) and if they can’t find it, they will look for a brand from that region,” she said.

Australian wine exports are worth $2.8b, and the total value of Australian wine is in excess of $5b annually.

The campaign will target top end wine markets in China, the United States and the United Kingdom, which are worth a combined $1.85b to Australia.

“Wine production is one of SA’s major agricultural industries, backed by our excellent global reputation for making a variety of superior wines,” Ms Ruston said.

Bird in Hand general manager and winemaker Jared Stringer said wineries had progressed to more than a place for a quick wine taste.

“It’s about what we can do in terms of the whole tourism aspect, visitors can taste some interesting wines, coupled with some local SA foods, creating a holistic experience,” he said.

Bird In Hand began exporting in the mid-2000s and is presently exporting to more than 30 countries across the world, with a particular focus on the UK and US.

But it’s the domestic market which has a huge impact for Bird In Hand, and each week it welcomes about 700 visitors to the cellar door.

“We are looking to invest in the next three to five years to grow our business with the restaurant and cellar door, creating a go-to place for people to visit when they come to the Adelaide Hills,” Mr Stringer said.

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