AI, eye-in-sky combine to help vines

AI, eye-in-sky combine to help vines


Horticulture
HIGH VIEW: The software launch follows on from trials in the Barossa Valley.

HIGH VIEW: The software launch follows on from trials in the Barossa Valley.

Aa

SATELLITE images, alongside artificial intelligence software, will be helping monitor vine health, in an Australian-first.

Aa

SATELLITE images, alongside artificial intelligence software, will be helping monitor vine health, in an Australian-first.

Geospatial Artificial Intelligence for Agriculture has been developed by Adelaide-based company Consilium Technology, in partnership with DigitalGlobe and Wine Australia.

The University of SA has also partnered with Consilium Technology for research and development into the product.

GAIA’s machine learning algorithms analyse the latest satellite images to quickly and easily provide detailed insights including assessing the impact of weather-related damage on vineyards.

It was unveiled this week at the 2018 GeoSmart Asia & Locate Conference at the Adelaide Convention Centre.

The software’s launch follows recent trials at some of Australia’s leading wine regions including Barossa Valley, Margaret River and Tasmania.

GAIA’s first test will be to accurately map and identify vineyards in Australian wine regions.

Growers are expected to have access to GAIA by the next Australian growing season, which begins in September, with plans expand the software into other areas of agriculture beyond viticulture.

Machine Learning at Consilium Technology director Sebastien Wong said the technology would help growers increase yields and the quality of their fruit.

He said the software would revolutionise the way small and large growers managed vineyards and also provide a more affordable way to examine vineyard crops.

“GAIA will help improve decision making and reduce risks in farming for growers,” Dr Wong said.

“Farmers have been previously using ABS data survey methods which is hugely expensive.”

Consilium Technology is a research service provider specialising in modelling, simulation and machine learning in various field including defence, minerals and manufacturing.

The software consists of three main components including a deep neural network, scalable cloud computing and advanced satellite imagery to map vineyards across Australia and monitor wine grape crops in real time.

“We saw agriculture as a real opportunity… there’s a huge amount we can do here,” Dr Wong said.

GAIA uses satellite imagery provided American company DigitalGlobe’s, a commercial vendor in space imagery and geospatial data based in Colorado.

“They have the lion share of the market and they are the largest provider of satellite imagery in the world,” he said of DigitalGlobe.

“It’s the AI that’s the groundbreaking aspect of GAIA. By automating it we can do things at scale.”

Wine Australia chief executive officer Andreas Clark said the expertise of Consilium Technology and DigitalGlobe was very exciting for the industry.

“Moving to a technology-based solution improves accuracy and timeliness and removes a reporting burden from our grape growers,” he said.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by