Safety alert as harvest grows

Safety alert as harvest grows


Cropping
BUSY LANES: With deliveries to receival sites revving up, those on regional roads are reminded to take care and be mindful of the increased activity.

BUSY LANES: With deliveries to receival sites revving up, those on regional roads are reminded to take care and be mindful of the increased activity.

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HARVEST deliveries have nearly reached 900,000 tonnes, with the Viterra network having its busiest week of the season so far.

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HARVEST deliveries have nearly reached 900,000 tonnes, with the Viterra network having its busiest week of the season so far.

Yield potential of dryland seed crops in the South East could be affected by the widespread frost damage in early November, according to Cox Rural’s Keith Scott Hutchins. 

 He said damage to lucerne seed crops was the most widespread he had seen in his career.

“It is in more than just a few paddocks, it occurred from Keith to Coonalpyn and it is a little bit unprecedented for frosts to occur in such a widespread area so late, in this region.”

Mr Hutchins said lowered crop potential was forecasted because frosts had caused lucerne shoots to burn off and turn yellow. 

“Dryland lucerne is a multi-purpose crop so essentially it stopped the quality of shoot growth, so it has to re-grow from the base again,” he said. 

“For the seed crops in particular, if it will be grazed off again, then growers would be relying on more moisture to get it up again.”

Mr Hutchins said broadacre crops were mature by the time November’s frosts arrived and were therefore less frost-affected.

With an increasing number of headers active in paddocks, Grain Producers SA chief executive officer Darren Arney is reminding all those working or driving on regional roads to execute more care.

“All travellers on country roads need to be mindful of increased activity with harvest equipment and more truck movement,” he said.

“There may be roads where people might not have seen a semi-trailer or B-double for a while, as they’re really only active at harvest.”

Mr Arney said caution needed to be in place for regular road users and those moving harvesters, augers and chaser bins between farms.

“Farmers are sharing the road with their neighbours, and their own kids going to school,” he said.

“Harvest is a busy time of the year and it’s worth being mindful of slowing down to ensure everyone stays safe.”

GPSA is also reminding croppers to take time this week to fill in the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator survey to ensure SA is able to maintain agricultural activities under a new national system.

Recent warm weather has particularly lead to an increase in deliveries, with the week’s receivals of 669,627t to Tuesday making up 75 per cent of the total 897,415t of the season.

The largest deliveries are in the central region, with the majority of sites open, some with extended opening hours, and 332,917t in the past week.

Lentils, in particular, have been busy with a new daily receival record of 2538t set at Two Wells.

On the Eyre Peninsula, peas are the most progressed crop harvested, followed by cereals and canola.

RECEIVALS: Harvest so far.

RECEIVALS: Harvest so far.

In total, 234,553t have been delivered this week while reaping of faba beans and lentils has just begun.

Delivery in the eastern region has also picked up with 102,157t of the 113,108t total arriving in the past week.

  • Details: Send in your harvest pics through the Stock Journal Facebook page or use #harvestSA.
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