New rules for bullbar design in SA

New rules for bullbar design in SA

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STATE LINES: David Britten-Jones, Elizabeth Heights, is worried about differences in state regulations on bull bars.

STATE LINES: David Britten-Jones, Elizabeth Heights, is worried about differences in state regulations on bull bars.

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THE five-poster bullbar will be relegated to history when SA comes in line with WA, NSW and Vic for Australian Standard regulations.

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THE traditional five-poster bullbar will be relegated to history when SA comes into line with WA, NSW and Vic in adopting the Australian Standard regulations.

SA manager of Safer Vehicles and Technologies Matthew Leyson said the changes would bring the state into line with other jurisdictions.

Any vehicle in the state built after July 1 last year with a bullbar must comply with the new rules.

Mr Leyson said making the standard into law – it was introduced in 2003 – had been delayed because SA manufacturers generally complied with it.

Registrar of Motor Vehicles for SA Julie Holmes said only a small minority of manufacturers were not doing the right thing, so it was deemed appropriate to stamp out non-compliance.

"We also had concerns about add-ons after the bullbar is fitted, like fishing rod holders which can stick out," she said.

"They're very dangerous for pedestrians and we certainly don't encourage people to do that."

The standard calls for bullbars that match the profile of the vehicle, not to be wider than the vehicle, have no protrusions and cannot be forward facing.

"The traditional four and five-post bullbars were the most obvious example of bullbars that will no longer comply," Mr Leyson said.

A collison with a kangaroo seven years ago convinced Adelaide Ute Club member David Britten-Jones, Elizabeth Heights, to install a five-post bullbar on his Holden ute.

"I did about $3000 worth of damage," he said.

"A good friend of mine, who got his bullbar from the same company, hit a kangaroo at high speed and there was minimal damage to his vehicle."

Mr Britten-Jones will be unaffected by the changes because of the age of his vehicle, but will have to look into the rules when it comes time to change his vehicle.

"This vehicle is a 2004-05 build and I've had it for 10 years; when she dies I'll need to get a new one,” he said.

"I don't have a problem with the changes, but they must be made to withstand impacts on what is out there in the scrub and bush."

He is concerned about the different rules among states.

"I think there should be a universal law that if you have a five-poster already, you should be able to travel anywhere in Australia and not get hassled," Mr Britten-Jones said.

"A couple of the other boys (in the ute club) have been west and as soon as they cross the border they get pulled over, because these are illegal in WA.”

* Full report in Stock Journal, September 18, 2014 issue.

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