Producers pleased with sheep sale outcomes

Producer happy at saleyard outcome


Sheep
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LAURA producer Jim Lynch was happy to receive $170 for the last of his trade lambs at Dublin on Tuesday.

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DUBLIN: Laura farmer Jim Lynch with Quality Wool's Glen Forbes at Dublin.

DUBLIN: Laura farmer Jim Lynch with Quality Wool's Glen Forbes at Dublin.

Mid North producer Jim Lynch was happy to receive $170 for the last of his lambs at Dublin on Tuesday.

He sold 95 June/July-drop White Suffolk-Merinos.

“I thought that was a good price, considering that was the last of them,” he said.

“It was probably $5 better than I thought it would be.”​

Livestock SA board member Jamie Heinrich, Parndana, KI, said it was a great time to be in the industry.

“With the forecast for high prices for mutton and lambs to continue, coupled with good wool prices, it’s great news for producers and should provide a lot of confidence going forward,” he said.

Livestock agent Garry Willson said prices paid at Dublin so far this year were better than a lot of people had predicted.

“They’re a long way in front of last year,” he said.

“All the good lambs are making $150 to $200, there’s no bargains at the moment.”

Mr Willson said he could not see prices coming back anytime soon.

“Processors are just killing more than what we’re producing at the moment,” he said.

“If it stays dry, prices won’t get any cheaper, but probably dearer, especially on good quality lambs.”

Pinkerton Palm Hamlyn & Steen director Robin Steen said prices had been outstanding so far this year.

“To see $6 a kilogram being paid as early as February, it’s never happened before in my lifetime,” he said.

Mr Steen could not see any reason why prices should retreat.

“People are still trying to rebuild their numbers,” he said.

“The cropping job isn’t great, so while people aren’t necessarily changing their enterprises, some are looking to run a few more sheep.”

It is not just the sheepmeat prices high.

Quality Wool national wool manager Glen Forbes said the wool market was up.

“If you go back to the start of the season, in early August, the Eastern Market Indicator was 1297 cents a kilogram clean,” he said.

“Back then, the difference between 16.5 micron wool to 20M was only 80c/kg.”

The EMI peaked in the middle of March at 1546c/kg, and it then dropped off to 1459c/kg. But at the close of Tuesday’s sale it was back up to 1489c/kg. And, the difference between 16.5M and 20M wool was 770c/kg, so those producing finer wools are being rewarded for it.

“Most guys I talk to across SA, they’re saying if this kind of money can be maintained, they’re more than happy to stick with wool,” he said. 

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